Impact Sheet

PLAYER

MATCH IMPACT

Ravindra Jadeja

100

Steven Smith

52

Peter Handscomb

46

Cheteshwar Pujara

45

Pat Cummins

40

Wriddhiman Saha

38

Glenn Maxwell

34

Shaun Marsh

31

Umesh Yadav

25

M Vijay

23

Steve O’Keefe

23

Matthew Wade

22

KL Rahul

13

R Ashwin

11

Matt Renshaw

10

Ishant Sharma

10

David Warner

8

Karun Nair

6

Nathan Lyon

4

Josh Hazlewood

3

Virat Kohli

3

Ajinkya Rahane

2

Note: In a career context, all numbers are restricted between 0 and 5. However, in a match context, the numbers are not restricted. For simplicity, we are changing the scale here in the report and expressing every Match Impact number as a percentage. The maximum percentage (100) is assigned to the highest impact player of the match. All other players in the match are scaled relative to him. Negative Match Impact indicates that not only did the player not contribute in the match, but he also had an adverse effect on his team’s chances.​​

Scorecard

Despite starting Day 5 (Monday, 20th March) on a precarious note, Australia denied India in Ranchi as they held on for a draw.

Ravindra Jadeja emerged as the highest impact player and bowler of the third Test.

The left-hander scored an unbeaten 54 (off 55 balls) in the only innings India batted but was far more effective with the ball, claiming as many as nine wickets in the match (5 for 124 and 4 for 54) – including seven of Australia’s top-middle order. He was highly economical too and his wickets had the visiting team under pressure in both their innings.

This was Jadeja’s highest impact performance in Tests against Australia.

Steven Smith (178 and 21) edged Peter Handscomb (19 and 72 not out) and Cheteshwar Pujara (202) to finish as the highest impact batsman of the match.

Although Pujara scored a higher proportion of runs, Smith absorbed more pressure (in their first innings, with Smith at the crease, Australia lost two wickets in the space of nine runs – 80 for 1 soon became 89 for 3, which is a ‘pressure situation’ not only in the context of this match but also given how vital first innings scores in the subcontinent are) and had New Ball Impact too.

The Australian captain was also the highest impact player for his team in this Test.

Interestingly, Handscomb and Shaun Marsh (2 and 53) had a higher Batting Impact than Glenn Maxwell (104 and 2) despite scoring fewer runs. This was because their knocks in Australia’s second innings, effectively their last chance with the bat to save the Test, thwarted India’s charge (together, the pair saw off 397 balls).

That the fourth-highest impact player of the match was adjudged ‘Man of the Match’ (Pujara’s impact was only 45% that of Jadeja’s) shows just how smitten the adjudicators are with aggregates, blissfully ignoring context in the process.

As many as five Indians and four Australians failed in the third Test, which only amplifies the importance of Jadeja’s performance – a bowling display in a match that was dominated by batsmen.

 

Karthik Swaminathan